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Arnold Schwarzenegger Bodybuilding Biography

Lifestyle, Motivation,

Arnold Schwarzenegger Bodybuilding Biography

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Arnold Schwarzenegger is without one the biggest names in bodybuilding, he is an idol to hundreds of thousands of young bodybuilders. He has made bodybuilding the sport it is today and still to this day inspires and motivates other to follow in his footsteps.


Arnold Schwarzenegger Biography
VITAL STATS:
Name: Arnold Schwarzenegger
Date Of Birth: July 30, 1947
Residence: Los Angeles
Height: 6’2″
Weight: 260lbs
Occupation: Bodybuilder/Actor

Arnold Schwarzenegger Biography

Arnold Schwarzenegger was born on the 30th of July 1947 in Thal, Austria, a small town 4 miles from Graz. Arnold grew up in the household with his father Gustav Schwarzenegger who was the local police chief, his mother Aurelia Jadrny and his older brother Meinhard. His parents had been married since the 20th of October 1945, Arnolds father was 38 and his mother was only 23. Arnold had a good relationship with his mother and kept in touch with her until her death. Arnolds father Gustav was a strict father, and favoured Meinhard, Arnolds older brother. Meinhard died in a car accident in 1971 at age 20, followed by Arnolds father the following year.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Bodybuilding

Arnolds Early Years

Arnold Schwarzenegger played many sports in his youth, but found his a true passion for bodybuilding during his mid-teens when his soccer coach took him and his team weight training. Arnold joined a gym in Graz, it was where he started to visit the local cinemas, wathching his idols such as Reg Park and Steve Reeves, on the big screen. Arnold also served the Austrian army in 1965, which was a required one-year service expected, at the time all 18 year old Austrian males had to fulfill. Arnold won his first bodybuilding competition, the junior division of Mr. Europe, During his year, although he had to sneaked off the base to compete in it. He gained alot of respect from his superiors but still had to be punished for sneaking out of the base. Arnold then moved from Thal to Munich, Germany, to manage his own gym while also continuing his bodybuilding career. He attended the NABBA Mr. Universe competition in 1966, in London, England and was also his first time on a plane. Arnold arrived in England speaking little English, and it was here he first started being referred to as The Austrian Oak, due to his large build and his story of performing chin ups from the limb of an Oak tree on the banks of the river Thalersee, the lake of his hometown. He would came second in the competition, but went on to win the title the next year, aged only 20, it made Arnold the youngest ever Mr. Universe.

Moving To America

In September 1968 Arnold decided to move to the United States, and started training at Gold’s Gym in Santa Monica under Joe Weider. It is here where Arnold became good friends with professional wrestler, “Superstar” Billy Graham. During this time, he also published his 1977 autobiography Arnold: The Education of a Bodybuilder. Also in 1977, Arnold declared, “Milk is for babies” during the filming of Pumping Iron, the documentary about bodybuilders that launched the Austrian’s superstar career. He earned a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Superior, where he graduated with degrees in international marketing of fitness and business administration in 1979. Arnold became a U.S. citizen in 1983, although he also retains his Austrian citizenship.

Arnold got married in 1986, to TV journalist Maria Shriver, the niece of John F. Kennedy the late President of the United States. The couple have four children, two daughters called Katherine (born December 13, 1989) and Christina (born July 23, 1991), and two sons Patrick (born September 18, 1993) and Christopher (born September 27, 1997).

Arnold Schwarzenegger Bodybuilding Career

Arnold Schwarzenegger first gained his fame as a young bodybuilder. One of the first competitions he won was Junior Mr. Europe. He then went on to compete in and win many bodybuilding and powerlifting contests, which included 4 NABBA Mr. Universe wins and 7 Mr. Olympia wins, a record which would remain until Lee Haney won his eighth straight Mr. Olympia title in 1991. In 1967 Arnold won the Munich stone lifting contest in which a stone weighing 508 German pounds, approximately 560 English pounds, is lifted between the legs while standing on two foot rests. Arnold broke the existing record, winning the contest. Arnold’s goal was to become the greatest bodybuilder in the world, which meant becoming Mr. Olympia. His first attempt was in 1969 where he lost to three-time champion Sergio Oliva. However Arnold came back in 1970 and won the competition. Arnold continued to dominate in the 1971, 1972, and 1973 competions, winning the Olympia with no real competition. In 1974, Arnold was once again in top form and won the title for the fifth consecutive time opposite Lou Ferrigno, who was the first possible threat to Arnold’s reign since Oliva. After the 1974 Olympia, Arnold announced his retirement from professional bodybuilding. However, George Butler and Charles Gaines convinced him to compete one more time so they could make the bodybuilding documentary called Pumping Iron. Arnold had only three months to prepare for the competition after losing significant weight to appear in the film Stay Hungry with Jeff Bridges. Ferrigno proved to not be a threat and a lighter than usual Arnold won the 1975 Olympia. After being declared Mr. Olympia for a sixth consecutive time Arnold once again retired from competition.

However, Arnold came out of retirement once more to compete in the 1980 Mr. Olympia. Mike Mentzer was defeated in this competition, despite being on his best ever form (a fact which caused him to leave the world of bodybuilding). Arnold was a late entry and won with only eight weeks of preparation. At the time, this lead to some controversy, some claiming that the Olympia had become a “popularity contest” rather than an objectivly judged competition. Arnold is considered among the most important figures in the history of bodybuilding, and his legacy is commemorated in the Arnold Classic annual bodybuilding competition. Arnold has remained a prominent face in the bodybuilding sport long after his retirement, in part due to his ownership of gyms and fitness magazines. He has presided over numerous contests and awards shows. For many years he wrote a monthly column for the bodybuilding magazines Muscle & Fitness and Flex. Shortly after being elected Governor, he was appointed executive editor of both magazines in a largely symbolic capacity. The magazines agreed to donate $250,000 a year to the Governor’s various physical fitness initiatives. The magazine MuscleMag International has a monthly two page article on him and refers to him as “The King”. Arnold’s first political appointment was to the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, on which he served from 1990 to 1993. He was nominated by George H. W. Bush, who called him Conan the Republican.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Bodybuilding

Arnold has reportedly won his first of seven Mr. Olympia title in 1970 with the help of Dianabol. He has admitted to using performance-enhancing anabolic steroids while they were legal, writing in 1977 that “steroids were helpful to me in maintaining muscle size while on a strict diet in preparation for a contest. I did not use them for muscle growth, but rather for muscle maintenance when cutting up.” However, some bodybuilders who used the same steroid cocktails as Arnold in the 1970s dispute the notion that they were used merely for “muscle maintenance”. Even Arnold has called the drugs “tissue building.” In 1999, Arnold sued Dr. Willi Heepe, a German doctor who publicly predicted an early death for the bodybuilder based on a link between steroid use and later heart problems. Because the doctor had never examined him personally, Arnold collected a DM 20,000 ($12,000 USD) libel judgment against him in a German court. In 1999 Schwarzenegger also sued and settled with Globe Magazine, a U.S. tabloid which had made similar predictions about the bodybuilder’s future health. As late as 1996, a year before open heart surgery to replace an aortic valve, Arnold publicly defended his use of anabolic steroids during his bodybuilding career. Arnold was born with a bicuspid aortic valve; a normal aorta has three leaflets. According to a spokesman, Arnold has not used anabolic steroids since 1990 when they were made illegal.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Contest History

2nd
1963 Contest in Graz, Austria, at Steirer Hof Hotel
WIN
1965 Junior Mr. Europe in Stoccarda, Germany
WIN
1966 Mr. Europe
WIN
1966 Best Built Man in Europe
2nd
1966 NABBA Mr. Universe in London
WIN
1967 NABBA Mr. Universe in London
WIN
1968 NABBA Mr. Universe in London
WIN
1968 IFBB Mr. Universe in Miami, Florida
WIN
1968 IFBB Mr. International in Tijuana, Mexico
WIN
1969 IFBB Mr. Universe in New York City
2nd
1969 IFBB Mr. Olympia in New York City
WIN
1969 NABBA Mr. Universe in London
WIN
1969 Mr. Europe ad Essen, Germany
WIN
1969 Mr. Europe ad Essen, Germany
WIN
1970 NABBA Mr. Universe in London
WIN
1970 AAU Pro Mr. World in Columbus, Ohio
WIN
1970 IFBB Mr. Olympia in New York City
WIN
1971 IFBB Mr. Olympia in Parigi
WIN
1972 IFBB Mr. Olympia in Essen
WIN
1973 IFBB Mr. Olympia in New York City
WIN
1974 IFBB Mr. Olympia in New York City
WIN
1975 IFBB Mr. Olympia in Pretoria, South Africa
WIN
1980 IFBB Mr. Olympia in Sidney, Australia

More About Arnold Schwarzenegger

Arnold had long planned to move from bodybuilding into a career in acting, as had done many of his idols, such as Reg Park. Initially he had trouble breaking into films due to his long surname, large muscles, and foreign accent, but was eventually chosen to play the role of Hercules (as both Reg Park and Steve Reeves had done) in Hercules In New York (1970). Credited under Arnold came to the attention of more people in the documentary Pumping Iron (1977), elements the name “Arnold Strong”, his accent in the film was so thick that his lines had to be dubbed after production. His second film appearance was as a deaf and mute hitman for the mob in director Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye (1973), which was followed by a much more significant part in the film Stay Hungry (1976), for which he was awarded a Golden Globe for Best New Male Star.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Terminator

of which were dramatized. In 1991, Arnold Schwarzenegger purchased the rights to this film, its outtakes, and associated still photography. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s breakthrough film was Conan The Barbarian (1982), and this was cemented by a sequel, Conan The Destroyer (1984). As an actor, he is best-known as the title character of director James Cameron’s cyborg thriller The Terminator (1984). Arnold’s acting ability (described by one critic as having an emotional range that “stretches from A almost to B”) has long been the butt of many jokes; he retains a strong Austrian accent in his speech even in roles which do not call for such an accent. However, few of the fans of his work seem to care. He also made a mark for injecting his films with a droll, often self-deprecating sense of humor, setting him apart from more serious action heroes such as Sylvester Stallone. (As an aside, his alternative-universe comedy/thriller Last Action Hero featured a poster of the movie Terminator 2: Judgement Day which, in that alternate universe had Sylvester Stallone as its star; a similar in-joke in Twins suggested that the two actors might one day co-star, something which has yet to come to pass).

Arnold Schwarzenegger Conan

Following Arnold’s arrival as a Hollywood superstar, he has made a selection a successful films: Commando (1985), Raw Deal (1986), The Running Man (1987), and Red Heat (1988). In Predator (1987), another commercially successful film, Schwarzenegger led a cast which included future Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura and future Kentucky Gubernatorial Candidate Sonny Landham. Twins, (1988) a comedy with Danny DeVito, was a change of pace. Totall Recall (1990), at that time the most expensive film ever, netted Arnold $10 million and 15% of the gross, and was a widely praised, thought-provoking science-fiction script (based on the Phillip K Dick short story We Can Remember It for You Wholesale) behind his usual violent action. Kindergarten Cop (1990) was another commedy. Schwarzenegger had a brief foray into directing, first with a 1990 episode of the TV series Tales from the Crypt, entitled “The Switch”, and then with the 1992 telemovie Christmas in Connecticut. He has not directed since. Arnold’s critical and commercial high-water mark was Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1991). His next film project, the self-aware action comedy Last Action Hero, (1993), had the misfortune to be released opposite Jurassic Park, and suffered accordingly. Arnold’s career never again achieved quite the same prominence, his aura of box-office invincibility suffering, although True Lies (1994) was a highly popular sendup of spy films, and saw Arnold reunited with director James Cameron, whose own career had taken off with The Terminator. Shortly thereafter came Junior, which brought Arnold his second Golden Globe nomination, this time for Best Actor – Musical or Comedy. It was followed by the popular, albeit by-the-numbers Eraser (1996), and Batman & Robin (1997), his final film before taking time to recuperate from a back injury. Following the failure of Batman & Robin Arnold’s film career and box office prominence went into decline. Several film projects were announced with Arnold attached to star including the remake of Planet of the Apes, a new film version of I Am Legend and a World War II film scripted by Quentin Tarantino that would have seen Arnold finally play an Austrian. Instead he returned with End Of Days (1999) – an unsuccessful and typically dark attempt to broaden his acting range – The 6th Day (2000) and Collateral Damage (2002), none of which came close to recapturing his former prominence. In 2003 he starred in the popularly received Terminator 3: Rise of The Machines, which went on to earn over $150 million domestically, but it still wasn’t enough to revive his acting career. His latest film appearances included a cameo appearance in The Rundown with The Rock and the 2004 remake of Around The World In 80 Days, notable for featuring him onscreen with action star Jackie Chan for the first time. His latest appearance was a cameo as the “Governator”, a Hummer H1, in the 2006 Pixar film Cars. Arnold Schwarzenegger has stated in many interviews he never regrets doing a role and he feels really bad when he turns down a role.

 



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